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EXTREME HEAT SAFETY!

6/2/2017 (Permalink)

Community EXTREME HEAT SAFETY! Extreme Heat Safety

DID YOU KNOW?

On average, heat is the number one weather related killer in the United States.

Source: National Weather Service, nws.noaa.gov

As summer approaches, it is time to consider safety precautions for extreme heat in the coming months. Heat affects all people, but especially the young, elderly, sick, and overweight. Urban area residents also have a greater chance of being affected than those who live in rural areas due to the heat island effect.

According to the EPA, “the sun can heat dry, exposed urban surfaces, such as roofs and pavement, to temperatures 50–90°F hotter than the air, while shaded or moist surfaces—often in more rural surroundings—remain close to air temperatures.” These surface heat islands are strongest during the day when the sun is shining, while the atmospheric heat islands are more likely after sunset “due to the slow release of heat from urban infrastructure.”

Whether you are in an urban or rural area, there are several things you can do to prepare for and prevent extreme heat from affecting you. If possible, stay indoors in air conditioning. Be sure to check on your pets who may be outdoors or bring them inside. Stay hydrated and limit alcohol and caffeine intake.

If you must go outside, wear loose-fitting, light colored clothing, and be sure to apply sunscreen often. Pay attention to signs of heat exhaustion, which are heavy sweating; weakness; cold, pale, and clammy skin; nausea or vomiting; and fainting, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke, which is life-threatening. Signs of heat stroke are a high body temperature (103°+), rapid and strong pulse, and possible unconsciousness.

If you think someone has heat stroke, call 911 immediately and move the person somewhere cool. Reduce body temperature with cool, wet cloths or a bath. Do not give a person with heat stroke fluids, and treat the situation as a serious medical emergency (CDC). If you live in a humid climate, be aware of the heat index. The heat index factors in the humidity, which can make the temperature feel 15° hotter.

Extreme heat is a serious danger. For more information on preparation and prevention, visit ready.gov or cdc.gov.

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Mold: Chapter 3 - The Professional Assessment

5/26/2017 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Mold: Chapter 3 - The Professional Assessment Mold Remediation

Ok, so you think you may have a mold issue.  You see mold growth,  there’s a heavy musty smell, or you just have a hunch something is not right and decide to find out exactly what type of mold or indoor air quality problem exists, if any at all.

In order to determine what the problem is, you can reach out to a Certified Mold Remediation company, like SERVPRO of Wayne, and get a free professional opinion.  We will inspect the areas of concern and offer opinion on cause, severity and next steps, which may ultimately involve the participation of a Certified Industrial Hygienist if the issue is serious or we can’t draw a satisfactory conclusion.

It is important to understand that a professional mold remediator is not necessarily someone who could, or even should, test for the presence of mold or develop a remediation project plan on their own as it could be deemed as a conflict of interest.  A third party evaluation should always be considered, which is why the involvement of a Certified Industrial Hygienist may be a critical component in protecting your home, your budget and your health concerns with any mold issue.

Certified Industrial Hygienists (CIH) are scientists / engineers committed to protecting the health and safety of people in the workplace and the community.  The CIH’s role, with respect to inspecting for mold and mold remediation, is:

  • The CIH will discuss the history of the environment with you to help determine root causes of any problem, from current or past water incursions or any other relevant environmental issue.
  • The CIH will visually inspect the areas of concern looking for water damage markers and the existence of visual mold growth.
  • They will make every effort to identify causes, if none are obvious to the homeowner, and provide corrective actions.  They may inspect exterior drainage, roof conditions, plumbing, etc. to make this determination.
  • The CIH may or may not take samples in their determination of existing mold conditions.  Sometimes conditions are obvious and testing becomes an unnecessary expense.  When samples are taken, these samples will be sent to a third party lab for analysis to determine the severity of mold activity and the various species involved.
  • Once lab results are returned, the CIH will produce a protocol for mold remediation and repairs to prevent a recurrence of mold growth.  This protocol becomes the defining project plan and is vital when you begin planning your project steps, project budget and begin the process of identifying contractors who may perform the work.
  • Finally, once any remediation work has been completed, the CIH will perform a Clearance inspection.  At this time, he will visually inspect the work area(s) to ensure satisfactory work was completed.  If he is satisfied with the visual examination, the CIH will take a final set of samples to ensure that the existence of mold, in the work area(s), is at satisfactory levels and the area(s) can be returned to the homeowner in a healthful condition.

There are several resources you can us to obtain a CIH.

  • They can be referred to you from a trusted source, like SERVPRO of Wayne,
  • You can find them online at various sources, such as the American Industrial Hygiene Association
  • You can perform a web search.

Be sure to always check credentials and experience in your selection process.

In our next chapter we’ll discuss project planning and budgeting for your mold remediation project.

Contact us at 973-546-4977 if you have a service need or click here to visit our website to learn more about SERVPRO of Wayne's Mold Remediation Services.

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Mold: Chapter 4 - Contractor Selection

5/24/2017 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Mold: Chapter 4 - Contractor Selection Choosing a mold remediation contractor

You’ve selected your Certified Industrial Hygienist and he’s performed his initial inspection.  If they have determined that there is a mold issue, their next step is to provide you with a written assessment and protocol, or mold remediation and corrective action work plan.

In this document, you should be provided:

  • the likely caused the mold growth,
  • current observations and conditions of the area(s) inspected,
  • sampling results (if samples were taken) describing the mold species identified and their impact,
  • a corrective action plan describing what repairs need to be made to prevent further damage,
  • a detailed remediation work plan which your mold remediation contractor will use is creating their proposal and work plan.

Your next step is to search for and invite remediation firms to bid on this project.  There are many sources you can use to identify potential candidates, such as:

  • web searches
  • referrals from your CIH or others
  • the Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (org) or other reputable certifying firm

When inviting remediation contractors to bid on your project, ensure they are qualified.  Some of the questions or information you may request are:

  • Insurance coverage: candidates should have, and be happy to provide you with, the following insurance information.  Each should have reasonable limits to address the size of your project:
    • General Liability
    • Pollution
    • Workers Comp
  • Certifications and Registrations
    • They should ideally be firm certified in Water and Mold Remediation by an organization such as the IICRC, IAQA or ACA
    • Registered with Consumer Affairs as a state Home Improvement Contractor
  • Prior experience or testimonials:
    • Ask for testimonials or references from recent clients
    • Beware of online reputations.  Good or bad, they may only give you a very small sampling.

Each candidate you select should then be provided with a copy of the CIH protocol and permitted a time when they can inspect the areas in question.  The CIH should be made available to each candidate in order to answer any questions they may have regarding the project and to verify their intended approach.  The CIH should not instruct them on how to assemble their proposal, but should give them guidance as to what will be expected in order to pass clearance.

Since you provided each candidate with the protocol, there should be no confusion regarding scope of work.  Each proposal should show a timeline to accomplish the work and provide ample details.  If the candidate you felt most impressed with is higher, try to negotiate.

At this point you should have enough information to make your selection.  Next we’ll present project time and budget planning.

Contact us at 973-546-4977 if you have a service need or click here to visit our website to learn more about SERVPRO of Wayne's System Services. 

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Mold: Chapter 2 - Detection and Prevention

5/19/2017 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Mold: Chapter 2 - Detection and Prevention mold prevention and detection, mold testing

How to prevent mold growth

The key to preventing and stopping indoor mold growth is to control excessive moisture and condensation. Keeping susceptible areas in the home clean and dry is critical. In general, mold will not grow indoors without water, dampness or excessive moisture.

Three main factors contribute to condensation of water on building surfaces:

  • Relative Humidity: Condensation occurs when the air is saturated with water and it cannot hold any more moisture. For example, steam generated from bathroom showers or from cooking can fill up the air with moisture, which will then condense into drops of water on cooler surfaces, such as mirrors and windows. Where possible, localized sources of humidity, such as clothes dryers, should be directly vented to the outdoors.  To lower indoor humidity during warm, humid weather, air conditioners and/or dehumidifiers should be used. In chronically damp areas such as basements or crawlspaces, it is often recommended that dehumidifiers be used to maintain humidity levels below 60 percent.
  • Temperature: Warm air holds more moisture than cold air. Condensation occurs when warm humid air comes into contact with a cold surface and the moisture condenses into water. This can often be seen on single-pane windows, where water condenses and then runs down, causing the wood frames and sills to rot and the wall under the windows to blister. Condensation can occur on exterior walls, particularly north-facing walls, if they are not properly insulated. Other chronically cold surfaces, such as cold water pipes, should be covered with insulation to help prevent condensation.
  • Poor Ventilation: Indoor humidity can build up if there is not enough ventilation and exchange of indoor and outdoor air. Where there is little or no air movement, such as behind dressers and cabinets, surfaces can remain cooler than surrounding areas, which can lead to increased condensation and mold growth. It is recommended that the area be ventilated and the occupants use exhaust fans (vented to the outdoors) to remove moisture from high-humidity areas, particularly in bathrooms, kitchens and laundry areas. Furniture should be moved slightly away from walls so that air can freely pass behind it. Air should be allowed to circulate between rooms and regularly ventilate to remove humid air. Fans should be used as needed.

Other things that can be done are to clean and repair gutters regularly, make sure the ground slopes down and away from the home’s foundation and keep air conditioner drip pans and drain lines clean. In addition, in air conditioned buildings in hot and humid climates, vinyl wall coverings on the interior sides of exterior walls should not be used, as these materials can trap moisture, resulting in mold growth underneath them.

In the case of floods or leaking pipes, any standing water should be promptly removed and water-damaged materials should either be dried out and cleaned, or removed and replaced. Porous materials that are wet for more than 48 hours are likely to produce mold growth and should be discarded. In instances where the water damage is extensive, it is recommended that professional help, such as a commercial restoration company, be consulted.

Should I test my home for mold on a routine basis?

Probably not. Looking for evidence of water damage and visible mold growth should be your first step. Testing for mold is expensive, and you should have a clear reason for doing so. In addition, there are no standards for “acceptable” levels of mold in the indoor environment. When air testing is done, it is usually to compare the levels and types of mold spores found inside the home with those found outdoors. If you know you have a mold problem, it is more important to spend time and resources solving the moisture problem and getting rid of the mold than to spend it on sampling.

What to do if you see or smell mold in your home

The most important step is to identify the source(s) of moisture, which result in mold growth, and make repairs to stop them. If you only clean up the mold and do not fix the moisture problem, most likely the mold growth will recur.

If the source of the moisture is related to a building failure or fault, such as a burst pipe or leaking roof, a professional contractor should be consulted. In instances where the moisture source does not appear to be related to leaks, floods, structural faults or rising damp, it is most likely due to condensation. If you do not see mold growth but smell a musty odor, mold may be growing underneath or behind water-damaged materials, such as walls, carpeting, or wallpaper.

Once the source of the moisture has been identified and fixed, you need to decide if removing the mold from the affected areas is something that can be done without professional assistance. If the mold growth was caused by sewage back-up or other contaminated water, potential pathogens may be present and the work should be performed by a professional contractor that has experience in cleaning buildings damaged by contaminated water.

If the mold growth is due to condensation or small-scale leak and is limited to a small area (fewer than ten square feet), you can probably do the work yourself following guidelines such as those that have been prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and AIHA.

On hard surfaces, such as countertops and furniture, use detergent and water to wash mold off and then dry completely. The use of biocides or chemical disinfectants is not recommended as these may be hazardous to occupants.

Moldy porous or absorbent materials, such as ceiling tiles, wallboard and carpeting should be removed and replaced. People cleaning mold should wear rubber gloves, goggles and an approved respirator to protect against breathing airborne spores. An N95 respirator would be appropriate for most cleanup projects, provided that you are medically capable of wearing a respirator. If you have health concerns, you should consult your doctor before doing any mold cleanup.

Over the past decade or so, the industry has given rise to many individuals and companies who tout themselves as experts and certified in various aspects of mold investigation and remediation, but who may have little or no practical experience. If you choose to hire a consultants to help identify your problem, or a contractors to perform the cleanup in your home, make sure that they have specific work experience in dealing with and cleaning up mold, and check their references.

Source: AIHA American Industrial Hygiene Association

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Mold: Chapter 1 - Background

5/4/2017 (Permalink)

Mold Remediation Mold: Chapter 1 - Background mold growth, mold remediation, black mold

The subject of mold growth and remediation can be a complex issue which prompts many questions:

  • How did the growth happen?
  • Is my health in danger?
  • How do I get rid of it?
  • Will it happen again?

We'll issue a series of blogs to present the various points on mold growth and what you can do about it.

What is mold?

The term “mold” is a colloquial term for a group of filamentous fungi that are common on food or wet materials. This includes the green Penicillium species that produces penicillin, and fungi that spoil our bread, fruit, cheese and crops. Most of these are Ascomycetes (def: ascomycetes include most molds, mildews, and yeasts, the fungal component of most lichens, and a few large forms such as morels and truffles) that produce a lot of spores.

The majority of the molds that grow on damp building materials are found in the soil and are adapted to grow on a wide variety of materials. Outdoors, molds live in the soil, on plants, and on dead or decaying matter. There are thousands of species of mold and they can be any color. Different mold species are adapted to different moisture conditions ranging from very wet to just damp. Many times, mold can be detected by a musty odor. Live spores act like seeds, forming new mold growths (colonies) under the right conditions. All of us are exposed to a variety of fungal spores daily in the air we breathe, both outdoors and indoors.

How mold gets into a house or building

Mold and fungal spores occur naturally outdoors, where fungi are the earth’s most important recyclers. Indoors, mold needs moisture to grow; it becomes a problem only where there is water damage, elevated and prolonged humidity, or dampness. Common sources of excessive indoor moisture that can lead to mold problems include:

  • flooding from surface waters (i.e., overflowing rivers) or from severe storms;
  • roof leaks from damaged or missing roofing materials, ice dams or blocked gutters;
  • storm-driven rain through window frames, exterior walls or door assemblies;
  • leaking pipes, sewer back-ups or overflows;
  • damp basements or crawl spaces due to a high water table or poorly managed rainwater drainage; and
  • condensation on cold surfaces.

Should I be concerned about mold?

It all depends on how much mold there is. Small amounts of mold growth in workplaces or homes (such as mildew on a shower curtain) are not a major health concern. Large quantities of mold growth, however, are an important public health concern. In addition, mold can damage building materials, finishes, and furnishings and, in some cases, cause structural damage to wood.

How molds affect people

Most people have no reaction when exposed to molds. Allergic reactions, similar to pollen or animal allergies, and irritation are the most common health effects for individuals sensitive to molds. Flu-like symptoms and skin rash may occur. Exposure to molds may also aggravate asthma. In very rare cases, fungal infections from building-associated molds may occur in people with serious immune disease. Most symptoms are temporary and eliminated by correcting the mold problem.

?Who is affected by exposure to mold?

There is a wide variability in how people are affected by airborne mold spore exposure. Currently, there is no established airborne concentration that is known to adversely affect any individual’s health. People who may be affected more severely and quickly than others include:

  • Infants and children
  • Elderly people
  • Pregnant women
  • Individuals with respiratory conditions or allergies and asthma
  • Persons with weakened immune systems

Those with special health concerns should consult their doctor if they are concerned about mold exposure. Symptoms that may seem to occur from mold exposure may be due to other causes, such as bacterial or viral infections or other allergies.

Can mold spores contain toxins?

Yes. Some of these fungi produce toxic metabolites (mycotoxins), and almost all molds that grow in the built environment can produce triple helical glucan, both of which are toxic to lung cells. Many studies in appropriate laboratory animals have demonstrated that very low exposures of these compounds can result in inflammation. The health effects of breathing mycotoxins indoors are not well understood and they continue to be studied. This research is done to better understand why epidemiological studies consistently show increased asthma among occupants of damp buildings not associated with atopy.

Black Mold

The news media and some contractors often refer to “black mold” or “toxic black mold.” It is usually associated with Stachybotrys chartarum, a type of greenish-black mold commonly associated with heavy water damage. Not all molds that appear to be black are Stachybotrys. The known health effects from exposure to Stachybotrys are similar to those caused by other common molds, and ?again in high exposure situations, are known to be associated with severe health effects in some people. Such exposures seldom, if ever, occur in buildings except during remediation activities by people not taking appropriate precautions.

Source: AIHA American Industrial Hygiene Association

Contact us at 973-546-4977 if you have a service need or click here to visit our website to learn more about SERVPRO of Wayne's System Services.

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MAY IS NATIONAL BUILDING SAFETY MONTH

4/27/2017 (Permalink)

General MAY IS NATIONAL BUILDING SAFETY MONTH NATIONAL BUILDING SAFETY MONTH, board-up, fire damage, flooding

Building Safety Month—in its 37th year—is an initiative of the International Code Council (ICC) and their 57,000 members across the world, as well as their partners in building construction and design, and the safety community. Building Safety Month is an opportunity to educate insurance and commercial property professionals, as well as the general public, on “what it takes to create safe, resilient, affordable, and energy efficient homes and buildings,” according to the ICC website.

The theme for 2017 is Code Officials— Partners in Community Safety and Economic Growth and highlights managing disasters, specifically natural disasters, in week three of this year’s campaign.

Some of the topics and tips shared throughout the month include Disaster Safety and Mitigation, as well as Fire Safety and Awareness.

The general public may not be aware how codes and code officials “improve and protect the places where we live, learn, work, worship, and play,” and this month can certainly improve that awareness!

IMPORTANT TIPS FROM THE ICC

Disaster Safety & Mitigation

  • If you live in a high wind or hurricane prone area and do not have tested and code- approved shutters for protection from wind borne debris, consider temporarily protecting your doors and windows by mounting exterior grade, 7/16" minimum thickness plywood and fastening it into place. Visit www.flash.org for detailed instructions on how to use plywood for emergency board-up.
  • Consider building or retrofitting to create a tornado-safe room in your home. Follow ICC/NSSA 500 Standard for detailed construction information and to ensure you achieve the highest level of protection for your family.
  • In wildfire prone areas, remove fine (dead grass, leaves, etc.) and coarse fuels (dead twigs, branches, etc.) within 30 feet of a building to create a survivable space in case
    of wildfire. Be sure to remove dry leaf and pine litter from roofs, rain gutters, decks, and walkways. Follow ICC’s International Wildland-Urban Interface Code® for detailed requirements.
  • Flooded roads could have significant damage hidden by floodwaters. Never drive through floodwaters or on flooded roads. Do not attempt to cross a flowing stream. It takes only six inches of fast flowing water to sweep you off your feet and two feet of water to move an SUV-sized vehicle.

Source: iccsafe.org

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SERVPRO® Expands PGA Sponsorship with PGA Fantasy Golf

4/6/2017 (Permalink)

General SERVPRO® Expands PGA Sponsorship with PGA Fantasy Golf PGA Tour, PGA Sponsorship, PGA Fantasy Golf

There is an old adage: “It never rains on a golf course.” As the official cleanup and restoration company of the PGA TOUR, SERVPRO® knows this isn’t true, but rain or shine, fans follow their favorite players’ performance at PGA golf tournaments throughout the season. Recognizing the ever-growing popularity of the game, SERVPRO has expanded its relationship with the PGA TOUR by becoming the presenting sponsor of the PGA Fantasy Golf games, available at pgatour.com/fantasy


“We know people don’t associate SERVPRO with the wide-open spaces and fair weather feeling of a golf course. After all, SERVPRO is the company you turn to when the unexpected, even the unthinkable, happens to your home or business,” says John Oliver, owner of SERVPRO® of Wayne. “But each SERVPRO business is also a local business, there to support the community in good times and bad. Teaming up with the PGA TOUR as the sponsor of their Fantasy Golf Suite helps us build connections within our local community. We want local home and business owners to know that we are there for them ready to respond at a moment’s notice if things go wrong.”


The new “One & Done” games were launched on January 3, 2017*, but the game structure allows players to join in on the fun at any point during the current season. Each week, game players select one player to earn points for them in that week’s tournament. The PGA Tour Fantasy game is based on accumulated FedEx Cup points and the PGA Tour Champions game is based on accumulated Charles Schwab Cup points. A player may select a given golfer for a tournament in each of the One & Done games only once in each season. Since some tournaments earn a pro golfer more points than others, game strategy is based on selecting the right golfers for the right tournaments. 


“With the first major tournament of the season—The Masters—just around the corner, now is a great time to start your One & Done game for this year’s tour,” says Oliver. “If you ‘master’ the trick of choosing the right golfers in the right tournaments, you could jump to the top of your Fantasy league.” The top finisher in the PGA TOUR game will win a new set of golf clubs, while the top prize for the PGA TOUR Champions game is a trip for two to the Charles Schwab Cup Championship at Phoenix Country Club in Phoenix, Arizona, November 6-12.


SERVPRO of Wayne specializes in disaster restoration, cleanup and repair services, helping to remediate damage, making it “Like it never even happened,” for both commercial and residential customers. For more information on SERVPRO of Wayne, please contact us at (973) 546-4977 or office@SERVPROsussex.com.


*PGA TOUR Fantasy One & Done presented by SERVPRO debuts this week


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Fire Damage: Escape Planning

3/17/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Damage: Escape Planning Fire Escape Planning

Plan Ahead! If a fire breaks out in your home, you may have only a few minutes to get out safely once the smoke alarm sounds. Everyone needs to know what to do and where to go if there is a fire.

Facts

  • A closed door may slow the spread of smoke, heat, and fire. Install smoke alarms inside every sleeping room and outside each separate sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home. Smoke alarms should be interconnected. When one smoke alarm sounds, they all sound.
  • According to an NFPA survey, only one of every three American households have actually developed and practiced a home fire escape plan.
  • While 71% of Americans have an escape plan in case of a fire, only 47% of those have practiced it.
  • One-third of American households who made an estimate thought they would have at least 6 minutes before a fire in their home would become life-threatening. The time available is often less. And only 8% said their first thought on hearing a smoke alarm would be to get out!

Safety Tips

  • MAKE a home escape plan.  Draw a map of your home showing all doors and windows. Discuss the plan with everyone in your home.
  • KNOW at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside easily open.
  • HAVE an outside meeting place (like a tree, light pole or mailbox) a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.
  • PRACTICE your home fire drill at night and during the day with everyone in your home, twice a year.
  • PRACTICE different ways out.
  • TEACH children how to escape on their own in case you can't help them.
  • CLOSE doors behind you as you leave.

IF THE ALARM SOUNDS....

  • If the smoke alarm sounds, GET OUT AND STAY OUT. Never go back inside for people or pets.
  • If you have to escape through smoke, GET LOW AND GO under the smoke to your way out.
  • CALL the fire department from outside your home.

Information provided by the National Fire Protection Association (nfpa.org).

Contact us at 973-546-4977 if you have a service need or click here to visit our website to learn more about SERVPRO of Wayne's System Services.

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Fire Damage: Home Heating System Safety

3/10/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Damage: Home Heating System Safety fireplace safety, fire safety

As the temperature drops outside, wood and pellet stoves may be fired up inside the home. What you may not realize is that heating equipment is one of the leading causes of home fires during the winter months.

Did you know that heating equipment is one of the leading causes of home fire deaths? With a few simple safety tips and precautions you can prevent most heating fires from happening.

Wood and Pellet Stove Safety

  • Have a QUALIFIED professional install stoves, chimney connectors, and chimneys.
  • Stoves should be listed by a qualified testing laboratory.
  • In wood stoves, burn only DRY, seasoned wood. In pellet stoves, burn only dry, seasoned wood pellets.
  • Have your chimney and stove INSPECTED and cleaned by a certified chimney sweep every fall just before heating season.
  • CLEAN the inside of your stove periodically using a wire brush.
  • Allow ashes to COOL before disposing of them. Place ashes in a covered metal container. Keep the container at least 10 feet away from the home and other buildings.
  • Keep a CLOSE EYE on children whenever a wood or pellet stove is being used. Remind them to stay at least 3 feet away from the stove.
  • Stoves need SPACE. Keep anything that can burn at least 3 feet away from the stove.
  • INSTALL and maintain carbon monoxide alarms (CO) outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. For the best protection, interconnect the CO alarms. When one sounds, they all sound.

Other Heating System Safety Tips

  • Keep anything that can burn at least three-feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater.
  • Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters.
  • Never use your oven to heat your home.
  • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment, water heaters or central heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional.
  • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed.
  • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters.
  • Make sure the fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home.
  • Test smoke alarms at least once a month.

For more information on fire safety, visit the National Fire Protection Association's (nfpa.org) website.

Contact us at 973-546-4977 if you have a service need or click here to visit our website to learn more about SERVPRO of Wayne's System Services.

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Fire Damage: Portable Fire Extinguishers

2/27/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Fire Damage: Portable Fire Extinguishers fire safety, fire extinguisher, extinguishing a fire, fire

Portable fire extinguishers can be life and property saving tools when used correctly. In order to operate an extinguisher, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) suggests remembering the word PASS:

  • Pull the pin. Hold the nozzle pointing away from you and release the locking mechanism.
  • Aim low. Point the extinguisher at the base of the fire.
  • Squeeze the lever slowly and evenly.
  • Sweep the nozzle from side-to-side.

Read the instructions on the fire extinguisher and become familiar with them before a fire breaks out.

Remember, extinguishers do have limitations. It is also important to ensure you have the correct type of extinguisher for your facility.

To find more information on choosing the appropriate class of extinguisher, please visit the NFPA website at nfpa.org.

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